Articles tagged with: Prostate Cancer

13
January
2018

Robotic Fellowship in Europe

Robotic Fellowship in Europe

Advanced robotic training fellowship in Europe


Nick Brook will be in Belgium from April to Sept 2018

I will be undertaking a period of advanced robotic surgical training at Onze-Lieve-Vrouwziekenhuis Hospital, Aalst, Belgium from April to September 2018, under the mentorship of Prof Alex Mottrie.

The OLV is a high-volume robotic surgery hospital with a large department of Urology. The hospital has been undertaking robotic surgery since 2001 and is closely aligned to the OLV Vattikuti Robotic Surgery Institute (ORSI). The urology department produces a large volume of clinical data on outcomes for robotic surgery and regularly reports on new techniques.


Advanced robotic skills to bring back to Adelaide

The aim of this outstanding and internationally recognised fellowship is to gain full competence in a range of advanced urological robotic-assisted techniques. The training is purely in robotic urology – five days of operating a week. I will return to Adelaide and be able to provide these advanced techniques to patients. The training serves three purposes. First, after six-months I will be fully trained in a range of urological robotic surgery. I will be able to bring these skills back to South Australia for service provision from October 2018. Second, the time will be invaluable in developing the skill set necessary to train our local urology registrars in robotic surgery. Since robotic surgery was introduced in SA in 2004, no registrars have been able to train in robotic surgery. It is vitally important for South Australian patients that doctors of the future are able to provide this kind of surgery. Third, the academic work and clinical outcomes data will open-up the possibility of international collaboration in this area for South Australia.

I undertook a period of fellowship training (2008-2009) with Prof David Nicol in Brisbane, and was appointed as a consultant Urologist in Adelaide in 2009, where I have been a urological surgeon with broad practice including benign and cancer work. I have a particular interest in urological cancer surgery and have been instrumental in developing urology cancer provision at the Royal Adelaide Hospital into a fully functioning multidisciplinary service. I have made a large contribution to the public service system by bringing innovative strategies and significant funding to the department.

I see a great number of benefits to this 6 month fellowship for the provision of service to the public and private hospital systems in Adelaide, and also for the development of our training registrars. I will be unpaid for this period, and will be leaving a young family in Adelaide for six-months. I believe this demonstrates my dedication to further training and professional development, and its importance for bringing high level robotic urology surgery skills to South Australia.


Categories: Updates

08
September
2015

Prostate biopsy infection - antibiotic resistance

Prostate biopsy infection - antibiotic resistance

Infections associated with prostate biopsy have increased over time, and there is growing evidence of infections that are resistant to the antibiotics used to prevent infection.

Resistant infections after trans-rectal prostate biopsy (TRUS)

About 1-2% of patients who have a TRUS biopsy of the prostate will develop a febrile infection, which can be serious. Antibiotics (usually ciprofloxacin) are used before and after biopsy to keep this infection rate at 1-2%. However, there is increasing evidence that many of us carry bacteria in our gut (and rectum, where the needle is passed through to reach the prostate) that are resistant to ciprofloxacin.

A recent study from the Journal of Urology (Liss et al.) looked at 2673 men from 6 different medical centres undergoing biopsy and discovered cirpofloxacin-resistant bacteria in the rectum in 20.5% of men.

We know that some men are at increased risk of carrying such resistant bacteria (known as ESBL), and these include men who have been treated with ciprofloxacin in the prior six months, and those that have travelled to SE Asia or the Indian subcontinent in the recent past. The bacteria are harmless in the gut, but become dangerous if seeded into the prostate by biopsy.

How can the risk of infection be reduced?

One of the ways to reduce the risk of infection is to consider a transperineal biopsy instead of a transrectal biopsy. In transperineal biopsy, the needles for biopsy are not passed through the rectum, but instead through the skin of the perineum, and the infection risk is greatly reduced. A study from Jeremy Grummet in Melbourne demonstrated a reduction in serious infection, with a greater than 10x reduction in risk compared to transrectal biopsy.

You can read more about this study by following this link to an article by Jeremy Grummet.

Follow this link to read more about transperineal biopsy.



Categories: Updates, Prostate Cancer

30
November
2014

Enzalutamide available on the PBS

Enzalutamide available on the PBS

From 1 December 2014, a new drug for advanced prostate cancer will be available and listed on the PBS. Enzalutamide is an oral drug used for advanced prostate cancer (metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer). It works by inhibiting binding of androgens (such as testosterone) to the androgen receptor (AR), as well as inhibiting the AR from entering the cell nucleus and from binding to DNA. It has had encouraging results in clinical trials.


What are the PBS criteria for enzalutamide?

The treatment cannot be used in combination with chemotherapy (docetaxel in the common chemotherapy agent used in advanced prostate cancer)

AND

The patient must have failed treatment with docetaxel due to resistance (this generally means progression of disease or non-response to docetaxel) or intolerance

OR

The patient must be unsuitable for docetaxel treatment on the basis of predicted intolerance to docetaxel

AND

Patient must have a World Health Organisation Performance Status of 2 or less (this means good performance)

AND

The patient must not receive PBS-subsidised treatment with this drug if progressive disease develops while on this drug

AND

The patient must not have received prior treatment with abiraterone

OR

Patient must have developed intolerance to abiraterone of a severity necessitating permanent withdrawal of abiraterone.

Categories: Updates, Prostate Cancer

30
November
2014

Abiraterone PBS listing changed from 1st December 2014

Abiraterone PBS listing changed from 1st December 2014

From December 2014 , the PBS criteria for abiraterone acetate changed, meaning that patients deemed unsuitable for chemotherapy with doxetaxel can be prescribed PBS-subsidised abiraterone.


What is abiraterone?

Abiraterone is an oral drug for metastatic prostate cancer that is castration resistant (meaning the cancer that is no longer sensitive to other forms of testosterone suppression). It works by inhibiting an enzyme involved in the production of androgens (testosterone is one of the body’s androgens).


What are the new amended PBS criteria?

Treatment must be in combination with a steroid (prednisolone)

Treatment can’t be given in combination with chemotherapy

Patients must have failed treatment with docetaxel because of resistance or intolerance, or be considered unsuitable for docetaxel chemotherapy because of proven or predicted intolerance to the chemotherapy.

Patients must have a good performance status (WHO status of 2 or less)

If progressive disease develops whilst on abiraterone, PBS-subsidised treatment with abiraterone cannot continue.

Patients cannot have previously received treatment with enzalutamide, or they must have developed intolerance to enzalutamide, which was bad enough to require that enzalutamide was stopped.

Categories: Updates, Prostate Cancer

28
November
2014

Should I have a PSA test?

Should I have a PSA test?

This short article may help you with the decision about having a PSA test (also known as PSA screening) to look for prostate cancer

Australia has one of the highest rates of prostate cancer in the developed world. The PSA test is the first investigation that can be done to look for prostate cancer. It is not a perfect test, and there are problems associated with the test, which is why you should be as well informad as possible about PSA.

Information for Patients Considering Prostate Cancer Screening

Background

  • Prostate cancer is common. Most men will develop prostate cancer if they live long enough. Despite this, only about 3% of all men will die of prostate cancer.

  • This indicates that most prostate cancers do not cause trouble in a man’s lifetime (‘low-risk’ or ‘indolent’ cancers). However, there are some more aggressive cancers that can cause trouble, and these benefit from detection and treatment.

  • Screening studies do show that the number of prostate cancer deaths can be reduced by screening with PSA. However, quite a large number of men need to be diagnosed by screening and treated to prevent one prostate cancer death.

  • One study (the Goteborg study) showed that 12 men need to be diagnosed to prevent one prostate cancer death. That means that 11 men were unnecessarily diagnosed. Another larger study demonstrated that (ERSPC) that 781 men need to be screened and 27 men need to be diagnosed to prevent one prostate cancer death. Thus 26 men are unnecessarily diagnosed.

  • Screening will detect many of these indolent cancers, and if they are detected, they may go on to be treated, perhaps unnecessarily.

  • Treatment is associated with long term complications in men, such as incontinence, erectile dysfunction (impotence) and bowel problems. Therefore, some men (indolent cancers that are treated) may have unnecessary treatment and suffer side effects.

The aim of screening

  • The aim of screening should be to identify aggressive or high-risk prostate cancers early, before they have spread beyond the prostate.

  • Some men are at higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer than others. These are men with a family history of prostate cancer, or with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer in females of the family, men of African-American decent, and men who have been exposed to some environmental agents (fire-fighters possibly, and veterans exposed to Agent Orange).

  • Most prostate cancers found by screening are low risk and do not need to be treated, and can just be closely followed by active surveillance (click for link to AS).

  • If you choose to be screened, there is a reasonable chance you will be diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer, and may be in a position where you have to consider treatment that may be unnecessary.

Your decision to be screened – what sort of person are you?

  • If you have risk factors for prostate cancer (see above), your risk of prostate cancer may be higher than the general population, and this may impact your decision to be screened.

  • If you are the sort of person who would be uncomfortable not being treated if low risk prostate cancer was discovered, screening may not be the right decision for you.

  • If you are the sort of person who would accept treatment for aggressive prostate cancer, but would be happy to observe (active surveillance) things if you just had low risk prostate cancer, then you may be a good candidate for screening.

Categories: Updates, Prostate Cancer

19
February
2014

A Safer Way to Biopsy the Prostate

A Safer Way to Biopsy the Prostate

Jeremy Grummet is a Urological Surgeon with particular expertise in urological cancer. He has been instrumental in the introduction of transperineal prostate biopsy as an alternative to transrectal biopsy, to reduce infection rates after biopsy. Jeremy is conducting multiple clinical research projects on prostate biopsy and heads the Victorian Transperineal Biopsy Collaboration (VTBC) research group. In this article, Jeremy discusses the techniques and advantages of transperineal biopsy.


What’s wrong with the current standard method of prostate biopsy?

A biopsy is where a sample of tissue is taken for examination under a microscope, usually to determine if cancer is present. As you can see from the diagram below, the easiest way to access the prostate is via the rectum. That’s why we perform a rectal examination - so we can feel the back of the prostate for any suspicious lumps. Most prostate cancers are located towards the back of the prostate (peripheral zone), so a transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy is a convenient way of sampling this area. Typically, at least 12 cores of tissue are taken during a TRUS biopsy.

TRUS biopsy

The other advantage of the TRUS biopsy is that it can be performed in just a few minutes by giving the patient intravenous sedation or using a local anaesthetic nerve block.

However, passing the needle of the biopsy gun through the wall of the rectum multiple times is problematic. As you’d expect from an organ that stores faeces, the rectum has a high concentration of bacteria. These bacteria don’t cause any problems as long as they stay in the rectum. However, passing the biopsy needle through the wall of the rectum allows these bacteria to access the prostate and its rich blood supply. This in turn can lead to a serious infection in the blood called septicaemia (sepsis). Septicaemia makes patients feel very unwell, requires hospitalization for intravenous antibiotic therapy, and can even be life-threatening.

This risk of sepsis in TRUS biopsy is well-recognised. It is therefore standard to use an antibiotic to help prevent such an infection. Unfortunately, the antibiotic doesn’t always work, so there is still a risk of sepsis, which has been measured at about 1-2%.

Today, there is the additional and growing problem of bacteria developing antibiotic resistance. This has been reported worldwide and was the subject of a major US Government report last year.

Our own research group, the Victorian Transperineal Biopsy Collaboration (VTBC), reviewed the scientific literature, finding that developing resistance is a particular problem for bacteria that live in the rectum, so that the antibiotics we would normally use, such as ciprofloxacin, can sometimes be rendered ineffective. This coincides with reports of increasing rates of TRUS biopsy sepsis even as high as 5%.

Our research has also found that, as a result of the above, some Australian and New Zealand urology practices have resorted to using big-gun broad-spectrum antibiotics on a regular basis to prevent TRUS biopsy sepsis. Whilst this may reduce sepsis for the individual patient, from a public health perspective, it is a step backwards, as widespread use of such antibiotics will lead to even more resistance. Unfortunately, we are already seeing this happening, with hospitals in Australia finding CRE (Carbapenem-Resistant Enterococci) in their wards.


What is transperineal biopsy, and why is it safer?

Fortunately, there is another approach to prostate biopsy which avoids perforation of the rectum altogether. Instead, the biopsy needle can be passed via the skin of the perineum. In men, the perineum is the part of the body between the scrotum and the anus.

TRUS biopsy

As shown in the diagram, the ultrasound probe is still passed into the rectum to provide an image of the prostate. But instead of the biopsy needle passing alongside the probe, it is passed through a grid, which itself is fixed against the probe outside the body. Prior to insertion of the ultrasound probe, the perineal skin is easily prepared in a sterile fashion, just as any other incision site is prepared before surgery to prevent wound infection. (Although worthwhile attempts have been made to sterilize the rectum, this has not been possible.)

Our group studied the experience of transperineal (TP) biopsy around the world and found that in over 6,600 patients, there were only 5 patients re-admitted to hospital for sepsis - a rate of just 0.076%, or less than 1 in a thousand. Furthermore, in our own published experience of 245 TP biopsies our rate of re-admission for infection was zero. (We have now performed over 400 TP biopsies, still without a single episode of infection.)

Based on the published scientific evidence to date then, it appears that TP biopsy is a safer option than TRUS biopsy due to its near-zero sepsis risk. It also gives the advantage of avoiding regular use of heavy-duty antibiotics, thereby avoiding promotion of resistant bacteria, now labelled by the US Government Center for Disease Control as a Serious Threat to population health worldwide. As a result, we now use TP biopsy routinely for all prostate biopsies.


Are there any downsides to the transperineal approach?

Looking at the diagram above, you would expect TP biopsy to be painful, which is why it is typically performed under a general anaesthetic (although methods of using local anaesthetic only have been reported). We routinely perform TP biopsy under GA. As a result, men experience no pain during the procedure, and very little afterwards, so that paracetamol is only required occasionally. Although a general anaesthetic is required, it is of a short duration only (less than 30 minutes) and is very safe.

Practitioners of TP biopsy initially reported a higher risk of acute urinary retention (unable to pass urine) with this approach. However, with further experience, and by deliberately avoiding the area around the urethra, this rate dropped so that it is now similar to the risk seen in TRUS biopsy (around 2%). Although a catheter has been used by some doctors, as shown in the diagram above, it is unnecessary.

Due to anecdotal experience, some urologists have been concerned that TP biopsy may lead to erectile dysfunction by damaging the erectile nerves or to more difficult surgery if cancer is found and the prostate needs to be removed. However, evidence to date, albeit scant, does not support either of these concerns.


Is it as good as TRUS at cancer detection?

According to the scientific literature, TP biopsy is at least equivalent to TRUS biopsy in its ability to detect cancer. Some research has also found improved detection of cancers at the front of the prostate (anterior). This may be due to the typically easy access TP biopsy provides to all areas of the prostate, particularly anteriorly. Conversely, it can often be difficult to reach the anterior prostate via TRUS biopsy, especially in large glands.


What other advantage might TP biopsy provide?

In TP biopsy, the ultrasound probe is stabilized by equipment that is fixed to the operating table. The grid through which the biopsy needle is passed is, in turn, stabilized against the ultrasound probe. This set-up permits accurate and reproducible biopsy needle placement.

In the past, TP biopsies were taken in a systematic fashion only, evenly sampling various areas of the prostate. Whilst this is still performed routinely, in addition we are now often performing targeted biopsies of suspicious lesions if found on a prostate MRI. The stable arrangement of TP biopsy therefore permits accurate targeting of such lesions, with the potential to further improve the accuracy of cancer detection.


You can read more about Jeremy Grummet by clicking this link

There is more information on transperineal biopsy on the AUA site.

And you can follow @JGrummet on Twitter.


Categories: Updates, Prostate Cancer, Prostate Surgery

Affiliations

Urology Affiliations

Latest Tweets

Contact Us

  • Nick Brook Urology
    Calvary North Adelaide Hospital
    89 Strangways Tce,
    North Adelaide,
    Adelaide SA 5006
  • 08 8267 1424
  • 08 8267 1370